7 Easy Tips To Conserve Water In Your Home

With record-breaking draughts devastating parts of the United States, it serves a good reminder that water is a finite resource. We should conserve as much of it as we can for future generations. This means your days of turning on the shower one hour before getting in to make sure the temperature is just right are over. And forget about leaving your yard sprinkler on all day. Aside from wasting water, you might as well be flushing money down the toilet.

There are a lot of easy ways to conserve water that don’t require any big lifestyle change.

  1. Turn the faucet off while brushing teeth and shaving. You don’t need the water running unless you’re rinsing your toothbrush/razor off.
  1. Take shorter showers. You can be using between two to five gallons of water for every minute you’re in the shower. So cutting your shower time back, even by a few minutes, can make a big difference.
  1. Don’t hand wash your dishes. Use the dishwasher instead. Dishwashers are much more water efficient than washing dishes in the sink.
  1. Compost pile. All those scraps of vegetables, fruits and other food bits make great compost. Your garbage disposal needs water; so use it sparingly.
  1. Keep an eye out for water leaks. A leak might not be very big, but over time you can lose a lot of water. Dripping faucets and leaking pipes are the most common leaks. But there can also be leaks in your HVAC system. This makes it very important to have your system checked regularly. Also, if you notice an unusually large spike in your water bill, it could very well be caused by a leak.
  1. Insulate your hot water pipes. This will reduce the amount of time you have to wait for your water to heat up. No one wants to stand with his/her hand under the faucet for five minutes waiting for it to get hot.
  1. Replace appliances with water-saving ones. These efficient models are pretty standard these days. They not only use less water, but will also save you money in the long run.

Keep in mind that your bathroom accounts for about 50% of your household water consumption, and your kitchen is about 10%. Of course, these are just averages and your usage may differ.

Regardless of where you use the most water, however, conserving water is not only good for the environment, but also your wallet. If you’re in an area with a severe draught, you might be forced to conserve water or pay premium prices for being wasteful.

If you notice that your water consumption is higher than usual, call a professional to inspect your home. A leaky pipe in your crawl space or AC unit could be costing you each month. Call us today and we’ll help you save the earth.

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